“Don’t let the world around you squeeze you into its own mould, but let God re-mould your minds from within...”
Romans 12:2

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Hilary's Desk

Eminence based medicine, part 2

Hilary Butler - Thursday, May 03, 2012

 In order to know what vaccines do, and how the body responds to them, you have to understand the immune system in the first place, right?. All parents believe that doctors and immunologists understand the immune system. They wouldn't introduce vaccines if they didn't, right?. You can't possible evaluate "reactions" and problems in the immune system after vaccination unless you understand the immune system, right? And when "evidence based" medicine is the gold standard, they wouldn't do something without "evidence" that a vaccine doesn't "harm" the immune system, right?

Wrong actually.

In a 2011 article called "The Bodyguard" The esteemed Stanford University tells us this (full pdf) :

If a patient were to ask me, ‘How’s my immune system doing today?’ I would have no idea how to answer that, and I’m an immunologist. None of us can answer that. Right now we’re still doing the same tests I did when I was a medical student in the late 1960s,” he says.
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Eminence based medicine - Part 1.

Hilary Butler - Wednesday, May 02, 2012

There is a fascinating video on medscape website which all parents should listen to, or read the transcript of. The article is titled: "Why Doctors Keep Doing Treatments That Don't Work".

The doctor concerned, states:

...."You have talked rather generously about evidence-based medicine. Most of medicine isn't evidence-based. The overwhelming majority is more "eminence-based," to steal from my colleague to the right [Eric Topol]. We do things because we have always done them. That is going to be less tenable, and you will be put under more and more scrutiny about "Why is that? Why is this happening to me?" or "Why, doctor, are you doing that as opposed to this?" You peel back the level that says, "Well, actually, there isn't any evidence to support that. That was merely my historical preference as opposed to my data-driven wisdom and decision-making." That will put pressure on what we do and will ask us to answer some of the questions about dominant practices that are founded largely by history".
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Does the plot thicken?

Hilary Butler - Friday, September 02, 2011

On 29th August, I wrote a blog about a blog discussing a doctor in Sweden who found arsenic in the Swine Flu vaccine.  An astute reader reminded me of a 2009 finding, reported in Science Daily (pdf) informing readers that arsenic exposure, compromised the immune system when it came to swine flu:

"The ability to mount an immune response to influenza A (H1N1) infection is significantly compromised by a low level of arsenic exposure that commonly occurs through drinking contaminated well water, scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) and Dartmouth Medical School have found.
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Can vaccines become cranial and immunological cluster bombs?

Hilary Butler - Wednesday, May 25, 2011

( Part 3 of 3 ) So what might happen when you repeatedly bombard a baby’s immune system with vaccines?  Continue Reading


How a baby fights infection and develops the immune system

Hilary Butler - Tuesday, May 24, 2011

The main and unique intermediary step between a NON-INFLAMMATORY phenotype, which is the default setting in pregnancy and for all baby mammals -  and a more individually competent educated immune system better able to handle the world's dangers and challenges.... is breast milk.  Continue Reading


Nutrition. Again.

Hilary Butler - Thursday, January 06, 2011

Yesterday, in discussing the cozy relationship of the medical profession with big pharma while paying lip service to nutrition, I remembered an old book I have on this topic.  It's quaint title is, "Intestinal Gardening for the Prolongation of Youth". It was written by Dr James Empringham, and published in 1926.  It's fascinating; makes me chuckle, and roll my eyes at the same time.  Why?  Because it shows just how insular the average doctor was.  And by proxy, still is.  Much of what he writes is just plain common sense, which us fruitloops have long been wise to.  There are a few interesting gems in this book, so have a gander at this lot: Continue Reading


Professor Crane, paracetamol, asthma and fever - again!

Hilary Butler - Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Dear Professor Crane,  In my print copy of the Herald (attached) the following comment is attributable to you: “The benefits of paracetamol for fever control still outweigh the potential of later allergy development..” and…”there were few other options for fever control in young children.” and ... that you don’t know how paracetamol is causing allergies.

The use of paracetamol for fever control, is immunologically irrational according to the medical research. All the of medical literature shows that paracetamol, which can reduce fever in some people, but fortunately, not in most, does so by down-regulating very important parts of the inate immune system – (ome of which are used in the allergy process), resulting in advantage to the pathogen.

You say there are no alternatives to fever control. Firstly, why does the medical profession believe that parents need to control infectious fevers in the first place? And if there is considered a “need” to reduce a fever, then why not use the methods that parents may have used, who have children 30 years and older, and who have NEVER used paracetamol at all?

The medical literature tells us that fever is a very important adaptive advantage for the host, and has a pre-programmed immunological process which up-regulates the immune system in order to help the person throw off the pathogens causing fever, and to survive better.

Not all doctors are continuing the dogma of infectious fever control in the face of thirty years evidence against it’s use.  Continue Reading


Don't do something, stand there!

Hilary Butler - Thursday, October 28, 2010

 "Surprise: Scientists discover that inflammation helps to heal wounds".  Interesting headline, huh? Remind you of anything?  Like "Fever helps the body successfully fight disease, and using drugs to reduce fever, gives the infection the advantage." ??  So why did the medical mantra of treating sprains with RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation), become so popular? Because the ONLY mantra acceptable to the medical profession, is, "Don't stand there, do something!"  It's never a question of "Should we?".  It's one of, "Can we? And if so, what?"  Researchers have finally caught up with people who have experienced the fact that ICING a sprain hurts it more, and leaving it alone heals it quicker. The body hates ice on a sprain, and it's is a stupid treatment.  Continue Reading


How doctors don't think.

Hilary Butler - Tuesday, October 26, 2010

In his book, "How Doctor's Think", Dr Jerome Groopman describes an ultrasound doctor, who detects in a baby, inside a woman 5 weeks from giving birth, a strange shaped space inside the baby's brain which should look like a tear-drop with sharp edges, but just doesn't look quite right.  Not badly wrong, but just not quite right. Because the shape is pretty near normal, she almost doesn't tell the mother.  Two things change her mind. She wants to protect any obstetrician from being charged with causing damage to a baby, should it turn into something significant... and she also thinks parents should know in advance in case they need to consider the realities of bringing up a damaged child. The mother has an MRI, and a brain haemorrhage in the baby is discovered, so the birth is attended by paediatric neurologists.  Continue Reading


Twenty-five years plus is quite a long time....

Hilary Butler - Saturday, October 02, 2010

(By Peter Butler) Especially when it's been spent dealing with issues and systems governed by engrained mindsets, and heavily influenced by huge vested interests more interested in profits, than making available all of the facts ...without restriction; or providing customized care to unique individuals, rather than trying to fit everyone into their "one-size-fits-all" moulds.

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